Agency fee. The agency fee is the remuneration for the agents who have attended to the ship's business during its stay at their port. 

All purposes.  When laytime can be added together by the Charterer for loading and discharging operations as if one total time is specified to cover both operations, this is "reversible laytime" and is referred to as the number of days. far all purposes In a laytime calculation based on reversible laytime a specific clause must the charterer the option and the charterer must exercise the option after declaring that he is doing so. 

AWRI Additional War Risk Insurance. This is an extra amount paid to the owner of a time-chartered vessel if the ship is ordered to a port or an area in which war or hostilities are taking place and the shipowner's insurers require an additional insurance premium for the vessel to be considered to be covered against risks in that place. 

 

Anticorrosive paint. This is a special type of rust-preventing primer on a bituminous base. It is used as a primer for vessel’s bottom paints in dry-dock. It has two functions: to prevent corrosion and to bind old anti-fouling that has become porous because the antitoxins or poisons have escaped.

 

Always afloat. In order to prevent a vessel from being ordered to proceed to a berth where she cannot load or discharge without touching the ground or a berth which can only be reached safely after discharging part of the cargo into lighters or which can only be reached on spring tidal conditions, the so-called "always safely afloat clause" is inserted in the charterparty. This clause may read as follows (as in GENCON):

Affreightment. This term is a somewhat old form of describing a contract to carry goods by sea, that is a "contract of carriage". 

Arbitration agreement. This is an agreement by the parties to a contract (for example a charter )to submit all or some disputes between them in any legal relationship they may have. The "Model Law" adopted by the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) in 1985 describes an "arbitration agreement" as follows:

Additional premium.This may be payable by charterers or shippers to the cargo insurers because of the ship's age, class or flag. The charterparty can provide that this extra premium is deductible from freight or from hire. The owner should attempt to qualify a clause with such a provision by limiting the amount of deduction and also by requiring the charterer to provide proper documentation as proof of the extra insurance before the deduction.

 

AG (Arabian Gulf). This suggests a range of ports in the Arabian Gulf (Iranian or Persian Gulf) where a ship can load or discharge cargo.

 

Page 4 of 4