Container slot management (CSM). The objective of this management in a liner operator’s corporate plane is to achieve the best utilisation factors of the container spaces or slots available on-board the carrier’s own vessels. The revenue is increased by the volume of the goods carried. If slot space cannot be found in the carrier’s vessels, the carrier may use “vessel sharing arrangements” (VSA) with other carriers under which slots on-board vessels are reserved for fellow carriers.

 

Container sizes. The sizes of containers depend mainly on their external dimensions, so that, for example, a container can be an ISO standard “Series 1 Freight container, Rating 1AA” with external dimensions of 40 feet (length) x 8 feet (width) x 8 feet 6 inches (height). The dimensions are used in either imperial or metric units. Although much of the world has become metricated, the “box” or container is still referred to by its imperial units, for example, a FEU is a forty-foot equivalent unit (of space occupied).

Colliery guarantee. This is an undertaking in a contract between the colliery owners and the charterer or shipowner. The colliery agrees to supply the cargo and load the vessel on usual colliery terms. If a reference to "colliery guarantee" is incorporated in a coal charterparty the charterer is relieved from any liability for delay to the vessel if the colliery does not supply the coal within the agreed laytime.

 

Cargo-Quality. A description in the bill of lading as to the quality of goods does not bind the carrier. The person signing and issuing the bill of lading is not considered to have the expertise nor the duty to ascertain quality. The shipowner can adduce evidence to show that the goods were not of the quality stated on the bill of lading.

 

Contractual liabilities. Liabilities incurred under contracts necessary for the normal operation of a ship, such as towage contracts, indemnities to port authorities, indemnities to stevedoring companies.

Brokerage (or Commission). It is customary to express the remuneration for the broker's time and efforts in negotiating and arranging the contract as a certain percentage of the money earned by the shipowner. (In marine insurance, the broker is generally paid a commission by the underwriter although the assured is the broker's client and the services are for the client.) In shipbroking, the term "brokerage" is generally preferable instead of "commission" because the latter term is usually related to the charterer's reward as "address commission".

CAF (Currency adjustment factor). Liner conferences are fundamentally international in character. The member lines are based in different countries and their domestic revenue and expenses figures will generally be in their own currencies.

Clear day. This usually means that the day on which the Notice of Readiness is given and the day on which the notice period expires are not included in the notice period. In this situation the expression refers only to the notice period.

CFS (Container freight station). This is the name given to a container base where goods in quantities smaller than that which will fill an entire container (that is, “break bulk cargo” or a “less than container load” or “LCL”) are dispatched for stowing into a container (“stuffing” or “consolidating”). The CFS facilities may be offered by freight forwarders or even by carriers.