CENTROCON. This charterparty approved by the Chamber of Shipping of the United Kingdom is in general use for shipments of grain from the River Plate to all parts of the world. It was published in 1914.

Container sizes. The sizes of containers depend mainly on their external dimensions, so that, for example, a container can be an ISO standard “Series 1 Freight container, Rating 1AA” with external dimensions of 40 feet (length) x 8 feet (width) x 8 feet 6 inches (height). The dimensions are used in either imperial or metric units. Although much of the world has become metricated, the “box” or container is still referred to by its imperial units, for example, a FEU is a forty-foot equivalent unit (of space occupied).

Cargo measurement. The EXXONVOY 84 tanker voyage charter form contains a comprehensive "Cargo measurement clause". Before loading, the master is required to measure the on-board quantities of oil, water and sediment residues, which are segregated in all holding tanks and slop tanks.

Coiled ship. This ship type would most probably be an oil tanker or a tanker to carry liquids in bulk. It would be provided with coils through which steam is passed to heat the liquid to reduce its “viscosity” and enable it to be pumped more easily.

 

Cargo-Nature and condition. If the nature of cargo is unusual the statement in the bill of lading should not be a very detailed description of the cargo without an attached certificate from an independent body, such as a surveyor or laboratory, to ensure that the-cargo matches the description.

COFC (Container on Flat Car). This form of transport is related to inter-modal transport in which a container with cargo in it would have been transported by sea or by road to a railhead and then loaded on to a flat rail-car for the remainder of the journey by rail. The deregulation of the railways in the United States in 1980 was extended to the intermodal COFC transport in March 1981 and this is one method of transporting goods which may have been the forerunner to other intermodal transport methods operated for containers, such as the DST or “Double stack trains” or the “piggy-back trains” operated by some railway companies and even traditional ocean carriers in the U.S.

 

Classification surveys. Classification societies carry out various surveys on behalf of governments, particularly in order to ensure that the vessel complies with relevant standards that are required to be met for the issue of essential certificates, such as the Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificate (SAFCON).

Closed conference. This type of liner conference restricts membership in order to protect the members’ market share. It is the most common type of conference.

Customary. This word usually refers to the rate at which cargo operations are to take place and may affect the time the vessel is made available by the owner for these operations.

Container leasing. Containers may be offered for carriage of goods by the carriers themselves or the carriers may not actually own the containers, rather leasing them from lessors. Other parties, such as shippers, may also wish to lease a container. Therefore the containers can be owned by the ocean carriers, the lessors and also other transport operators, such as railway companies, shippers C themselves and large freight forwarders.