Carrier. The carrier of goods under a bill of lading to which the. Hague-Visby Rules apply includes the shipowner or the charterer who enters into a contract of carriage with a shipper.

CFS (Container freight station). This is the name given to a container base where goods in quantities smaller than that which will fill an entire container (that is, “break bulk cargo” or a “less than container load” or “LCL”) are dispatched for stowing into a container (“stuffing” or “consolidating”). The CFS facilities may be offered by freight forwarders or even by carriers.

 

CAF (Currency adjustment factor). Liner conferences are fundamentally international in character. The member lines are based in different countries and their domestic revenue and expenses figures will generally be in their own currencies.

Coiled ship. This ship type would most probably be an oil tanker or a tanker to carry liquids in bulk. It would be provided with coils through which steam is passed to heat the liquid to reduce its “viscosity” and enable it to be pumped more easily.

 

CMI. Comite Maritime International. A group of international lawyers and law associations specialising in maritime law, based in Antwerp, Belgium. CMI is responsible for some documents used in chartering, e.g., for the "Charterparty Laytime Definitions". The CMI has also compiled a list of arbitrators, well-experienced in maritime arbitration and able to decide disputes arising from charters. Parties to a charter dispute can choose arbitrators from this list.

 

Complement. The entire crew of a vessel is called the “complement”. The complement can be subdivided into, for example, the officer complement, and the rating complement.

 

Container slot management (CSM). The objective of this management in a liner operator’s corporate plane is to achieve the best utilisation factors of the container spaces or slots available on-board the carrier’s own vessels. The revenue is increased by the volume of the goods carried. If slot space cannot be found in the carrier’s vessels, the carrier may use “vessel sharing arrangements” (VSA) with other carriers under which slots on-board vessels are reserved for fellow carriers.

 

Carriage of Goods by Sea Act (COGSA). Such legislation is introduced by countries to make uniform rules for the carriage of goods by sea, usually under bills of lading. The legislation generally implements the Hague or Hague-Visby Rules and applies only to hills of lading and waybills and this is stated in the "Clause Paramount" in the charterparty. Examples of legislation are: the U.K. Carriage of Goods by Sea Act 1971 and the Carriage of Goods by Sea Act of the United States (1936).

Continuation clause. Hull Time policies can contain a “continuation” clause. As a rule, time policies are made for a maximum of 12 months, but obviously it is impossible to judge in advance whether the vessel will be at sea or not on expiration of the policy.