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Clear day. This usually means that the day on which the Notice of Readiness is given and the day on which the notice period expires are not included in the notice period. In this situation the expression refers only to the notice period.

Charterparty bills of lading. In "Charterers' bills of lading" (above)' emphasis was laid on the identity of the carrier and whether this person was the charterer. The charterparty and the bill of lading are also connected usually by incorporation of charterparty terms and conditions into the bill of lading.

Consignment clause. A charterparty may stipulate the vessel will be consigned to owners' agents or charterers' agents for inward or outward business. If charterers are entitled to appoint agents at port of loading or discharge the owner must use the services of the charterers' agent and pay for those services.

 

Collision and dock damage. Excess collision liability. Proportion of collision liability relating to wreck removal, dock damage or oil pollution caused by the other ship.

 

Cofferdam. In oil tankers the oil tanks are separated from the engine room by means of a cofferdam formed by two transverse bulkheads. The cofferdam extends over the entire breadth of the vessel and prevents leakage from the oil tanks to the engine room or diesel-oil bunkers. The pump rooms are also separated from adjacent tanks by cofferdams.

 

Colliery scale. Scale rates can be incorporated into a charterparty depending on the place of loading. These are rates, which are set by organisations, which publish standard-form- charterparties after discussion with shipowners and collieries at the ports of loading. The scale rates also contain rates for demurrage.

 

CFS (Container freight station). This is the name given to a container base where goods in quantities smaller than that which will fill an entire container (that is, “break bulk cargo” or a “less than container load” or “LCL”) are dispatched for stowing into a container (“stuffing” or “consolidating”). The CFS facilities may be offered by freight forwarders or even by carriers.

 

Paramount clause. (Also termed Clause Paramount.) This clause is generally found in a bill of lading but can also be found in a charterparty. The main purpose of such a clause is to incorporate the terms and conditions of the Hague or Hague-Visby Rules (or the Hamburg Rules) into the document which is (or which evidences) the contract of carriage of goods by sea. The Paramount clause can also incorporate particular legislation, such as the United States Carriage of Goods by Sea Act 1936.

 

Conbulker. This is a type of vessel that can carry containers on one leg of a voyage and bulk cargo on the return leg. The structure of the vessel permits the cargoes to be changed easily.

 

Cargo-Quality. A description in the bill of lading as to the quality of goods does not bind the carrier. The person signing and issuing the bill of lading is not considered to have the expertise nor the duty to ascertain quality. The shipowner can adduce evidence to show that the goods were not of the quality stated on the bill of lading.

 

Container sizes. The sizes of containers depend mainly on their external dimensions, so that, for example, a container can be an ISO standard “Series 1 Freight container, Rating 1AA” with external dimensions of 40 feet (length) x 8 feet (width) x 8 feet 6 inches (height). The dimensions are used in either imperial or metric units. Although much of the world has become metricated, the “box” or container is still referred to by its imperial units, for example, a FEU is a forty-foot equivalent unit (of space occupied).

Centre of gravity (G). The line of action of the weight (force) of a body acts vertically downwards through this point, named “G”. For a uniform block, G is at the centre. For a ship, the position of G depends on the various weights in the ship.

 

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