Container flow management (CFM). This expression is related to container logistics. This approach to logistics involved the management of the fleet of containers themselves, not the fleet of container vessels and the spaces (or “slots”) on board the vessels. The management also involves the movement of a container from one point to another without consideration of the actual mode of transport. The traditional carrier thus becomes a true “transport organiser”.

 

Carrier. The carrier of goods under a bill of lading to which the. Hague-Visby Rules apply includes the shipowner or the charterer who enters into a contract of carriage with a shipper.

Container slot management (CSM). The objective of this management in a liner operator’s corporate plane is to achieve the best utilisation factors of the container spaces or slots available on-board the carrier’s own vessels. The revenue is increased by the volume of the goods carried. If slot space cannot be found in the carrier’s vessels, the carrier may use “vessel sharing arrangements” (VSA) with other carriers under which slots on-board vessels are reserved for fellow carriers.

 

Contractual liabilities. Liabilities incurred under contracts necessary for the normal operation of a ship, such as towage contracts, indemnities to port authorities, indemnities to stevedoring companies.

Costs and expenses. Legal, technical or otherwise, incurred in investigating, defending, or pursuing a claim against which a member is covered by the club may also be payable by the club.

Ceiling.The ceiling consists of wooden planks laid on top of the double bottom tanks. The planks are laid longitudinally and prevent contact between the cargo and the double bottom.

Cofferdam. In oil tankers the oil tanks are separated from the engine room by means of a cofferdam formed by two transverse bulkheads. The cofferdam extends over the entire breadth of the vessel and prevents leakage from the oil tanks to the engine room or diesel-oil bunkers. The pump rooms are also separated from adjacent tanks by cofferdams.

 

Cross trades. On trade routes between two places or countries the ships belonging to each country may have a large share of the trade but ships belonging to other countries may be allowed to carry cargo as “cross traders”.

CMI. Comite Maritime International. A group of international lawyers and law associations specialising in maritime law, based in Antwerp, Belgium. CMI is responsible for some documents used in chartering, e.g., for the "Charterparty Laytime Definitions". The CMI has also compiled a list of arbitrators, well-experienced in maritime arbitration and able to decide disputes arising from charters. Parties to a charter dispute can choose arbitrators from this list.

 

Colliery working days. This is a description of type of laytime depending on the ordinary working hours of the colliery from which the coal will be delivered to the vessel. The working days are related to normal times and in normal circumstances. Colliery holidays will be "holidays" if an exception to laytime exists in the charterparty (for example, "SHEX"). If the workers in a colliery are on strike, the delay is not excepted from the laytime, unless, of course, there is an appropriate "strike clause", unless a Sunday or holiday occurs during the strike.

 

Charter. The contract to carry goods by sea or to hire or lease or use a ship. "To charter" means to enter into the contract. The contract can be for a period of time ("time charter" or "bareboat charter") or for one or more voyages ("voyage charter").

 

Consignment clause. A charterparty may stipulate the vessel will be consigned to owners' agents or charterers' agents for inward or outward business. If charterers are entitled to appoint agents at port of loading or discharge the owner must use the services of the charterers' agent and pay for those services.

 

Brokerage (or Commission). It is customary to express the remuneration for the broker's time and efforts in negotiating and arranging the contract as a certain percentage of the money earned by the shipowner. (In marine insurance, the broker is generally paid a commission by the underwriter although the assured is the broker's client and the services are for the client.) In shipbroking, the term "brokerage" is generally preferable instead of "commission" because the latter term is usually related to the charterer's reward as "address commission".

Centre of buoyancy (B). This is the geometric centre of the under water shape or volume of a floating object. The buoyancy force provided by the liquid in which the object floats acts vertically upwards through B.