Charterparty bills of lading. In "Charterers' bills of lading" (above)' emphasis was laid on the identity of the carrier and whether this person was the charterer. The charterparty and the bill of lading are also connected usually by incorporation of charterparty terms and conditions into the bill of lading.

Containerisation system. Containers are not new. From earliest times human beings have used objects designed to hold other things. Even nature did this before man thought of it. The egg is an obvious example. The use of containers in shipping is also not new. Jars for oil and wine were used thousands of years ago.

Calls or Premiums. Some mutual associations term the payments for cover as “calls” while others term them as “premiums”. The concept of mutuality is that each member protects the others and this is done by levying “calls” rather than the businessman’s “premium”.

Containers and bills of lading. With the advent of containerisation and also intermodalism, much cargo is being carried in containers, especially smaller consignments which can be carried on a "door-to-door" service.

Centre of buoyancy (B). This is the geometric centre of the under water shape or volume of a floating object. The buoyancy force provided by the liquid in which the object floats acts vertically upwards through B.

 

Convenient speed. The stipulation in a voyage charterparty that the vessel, after completion of loading, shall proceed with all possible speed to port of destination, is usually changed into "with all convenient speed" or "with all reasonable speed" The latter expression eliminates any controversy, which may arise about the speed actually maintained on the voyage.

Classification surveys. Classification societies carry out various surveys on behalf of governments, particularly in order to ensure that the vessel complies with relevant standards that are required to be met for the issue of essential certificates, such as the Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificate (SAFCON).

Collision Liability. Around the middle of the 19th century, hull underwriters decided to extend the hull and machinery policy to embrace legal liabilities incurred by the assured in consequence of collision between the insured ship and any other ship or vessel. Liabilities resulting from contract with anything other than another ship or vessel were excluded from the cover, as were loss of life or personal injury.

Colliery. A "colliery" is a coal mine and in voyage charters for the carriage of coal the laytime agreed may depend on the working hours of the mine, if the coal cargo has to be delivered to the vessel. The word is connected to expressions that affect laytime.

 

CY (Container yard). This is the container base from where the carriage will commence or where the ocean carriage ends. It is usually in the container port facility and is under the control of the ocean carrier. 

The CY can also be under the control of other carriers, for example, at a railway yard or at an airport.

 

CMI. Comite Maritime International. A group of international lawyers and law associations specialising in maritime law, based in Antwerp, Belgium. CMI is responsible for some documents used in chartering, e.g., for the "Charterparty Laytime Definitions". The CMI has also compiled a list of arbitrators, well-experienced in maritime arbitration and able to decide disputes arising from charters. Parties to a charter dispute can choose arbitrators from this list.

 

Container flow management (CFM). This expression is related to container logistics. This approach to logistics involved the management of the fleet of containers themselves, not the fleet of container vessels and the spaces (or “slots”) on board the vessels. The management also involves the movement of a container from one point to another without consideration of the actual mode of transport. The traditional carrier thus becomes a true “transport organiser”.

 

Colliery scale. Scale rates can be incorporated into a charterparty depending on the place of loading. These are rates, which are set by organisations, which publish standard-form- charterparties after discussion with shipowners and collieries at the ports of loading. The scale rates also contain rates for demurrage.

 

Continuation clause. Hull Time policies can contain a “continuation” clause. As a rule, time policies are made for a maximum of 12 months, but obviously it is impossible to judge in advance whether the vessel will be at sea or not on expiration of the policy.