Carrier. The carrier of goods under a bill of lading to which the. Hague-Visby Rules apply includes the shipowner or the charterer who enters into a contract of carriage with a shipper.

Contractual liabilities. Liabilities incurred under contracts necessary for the normal operation of a ship, such as towage contracts, indemnities to port authorities, indemnities to stevedoring companies.

Charterparty bills of lading. In "Charterers' bills of lading" (above)' emphasis was laid on the identity of the carrier and whether this person was the charterer. The charterparty and the bill of lading are also connected usually by incorporation of charterparty terms and conditions into the bill of lading.

Centre of buoyancy (B). This is the geometric centre of the under water shape or volume of a floating object. The buoyancy force provided by the liquid in which the object floats acts vertically upwards through B.

 

Costs and expenses. Legal, technical or otherwise, incurred in investigating, defending, or pursuing a claim against which a member is covered by the club may also be payable by the club.

Colliery. A "colliery" is a coal mine and in voyage charters for the carriage of coal the laytime agreed may depend on the working hours of the mine, if the coal cargo has to be delivered to the vessel. The word is connected to expressions that affect laytime.

 

Customary. This word usually refers to the rate at which cargo operations are to take place and may affect the time the vessel is made available by the owner for these operations.

Charter. The contract to carry goods by sea or to hire or lease or use a ship. "To charter" means to enter into the contract. The contract can be for a period of time ("time charter" or "bareboat charter") or for one or more voyages ("voyage charter").

 

CY (Container yard). This is the container base from where the carriage will commence or where the ocean carriage ends. It is usually in the container port facility and is under the control of the ocean carrier. 

The CY can also be under the control of other carriers, for example, at a railway yard or at an airport.

 

Charterparty. This is the document that contains the details of the charter or contract. While the shipowner and charterer are called the "parties to the charter", the word "party" in "charterparty" originates from the old Latin phrase for the contract to use a ship.

Container leasing. Containers may be offered for carriage of goods by the carriers themselves or the carriers may not actually own the containers, rather leasing them from lessors. Other parties, such as shippers, may also wish to lease a container. Therefore the containers can be owned by the ocean carriers, the lessors and also other transport operators, such as railway companies, shippers C themselves and large freight forwarders.

Cartel. This is a price-fixing body formed of providers or suppliers of goods or services. A liner conference can be considered to be a cartel to fix the freight rates.

 

Collision Liability. Around the middle of the 19th century, hull underwriters decided to extend the hull and machinery policy to embrace legal liabilities incurred by the assured in consequence of collision between the insured ship and any other ship or vessel. Liabilities resulting from contract with anything other than another ship or vessel were excluded from the cover, as were loss of life or personal injury.

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