Paramount clause. (Also termed Clause Paramount.) This clause is generally found in a bill of lading but can also be found in a charterparty. The main purpose of such a clause is to incorporate the terms and conditions of the Hague or Hague-Visby Rules (or the Hamburg Rules) into the document which is (or which evidences) the contract of carriage of goods by sea. The Paramount clause can also incorporate particular legislation, such as the United States Carriage of Goods by Sea Act 1936.

 

Container leasing. Containers may be offered for carriage of goods by the carriers themselves or the carriers may not actually own the containers, rather leasing them from lessors. Other parties, such as shippers, may also wish to lease a container. Therefore the containers can be owned by the ocean carriers, the lessors and also other transport operators, such as railway companies, shippers C themselves and large freight forwarders.

Customary. This word usually refers to the rate at which cargo operations are to take place and may affect the time the vessel is made available by the owner for these operations.

Cargo-Quality. A description in the bill of lading as to the quality of goods does not bind the carrier. The person signing and issuing the bill of lading is not considered to have the expertise nor the duty to ascertain quality. The shipowner can adduce evidence to show that the goods were not of the quality stated on the bill of lading.

 

Cover note. A contract of marine insurance concluded when the proposal of the assured is accepted by the insurer, whether the policy is then issued or not. For the purpose of showing when the proposal was accepted, reference may be made to the slip or cover note or other customary memorandum of the contract, although it may be unstamped.

Ceiling.The ceiling consists of wooden planks laid on top of the double bottom tanks. The planks are laid longitudinally and prevent contact between the cargo and the double bottom.

Carrier. The carrier of goods under a bill of lading to which the. Hague-Visby Rules apply includes the shipowner or the charterer who enters into a contract of carriage with a shipper.

Cleaning. When an oil tanker or chemical tanker carries one cargo, it must usually be cleaned before the next cargo and also to reduce the "clingage" and residues on the parts of the ship's structure inside the cargo spaces.

Contractual liabilities. Liabilities incurred under contracts necessary for the normal operation of a ship, such as towage contracts, indemnities to port authorities, indemnities to stevedoring companies.

Concentrates. This is a material in small particle form which results from a processing of natural ore. The main hazard associated with concentrates is that moisture entrained in the particles may settle out and the surface reach a nearly fluid state which will affect the ship’s stability if the cargo shifts. Moreover, some concentrates, such as iron concentrates produced when iron is crushed dry, contain sulphur so that if concentrates become damp the sulphur reacts with the oxygen in the surrounding air to produce heat. Compartments containing concentrates should not be ventilated in order to reduce the oxygen content.

 

Cofferdam. In oil tankers the oil tanks are separated from the engine room by means of a cofferdam formed by two transverse bulkheads. The cofferdam extends over the entire breadth of the vessel and prevents leakage from the oil tanks to the engine room or diesel-oil bunkers. The pump rooms are also separated from adjacent tanks by cofferdams.

 

CY (Container yard). This is the container base from where the carriage will commence or where the ocean carriage ends. It is usually in the container port facility and is under the control of the ocean carrier. 

The CY can also be under the control of other carriers, for example, at a railway yard or at an airport.

 

CMI. Comite Maritime International. A group of international lawyers and law associations specialising in maritime law, based in Antwerp, Belgium. CMI is responsible for some documents used in chartering, e.g., for the "Charterparty Laytime Definitions". The CMI has also compiled a list of arbitrators, well-experienced in maritime arbitration and able to decide disputes arising from charters. Parties to a charter dispute can choose arbitrators from this list.

 

Charterparty. This is the document that contains the details of the charter or contract. While the shipowner and charterer are called the "parties to the charter", the word "party" in "charterparty" originates from the old Latin phrase for the contract to use a ship.