CENTROCON. This charterparty approved by the Chamber of Shipping of the United Kingdom is in general use for shipments of grain from the River Plate to all parts of the world. It was published in 1914.

CIM. The full, French name for this international Convention which relates to the carriage of goods by rail is “Convention Internationale Concernant le Transport des Marchandises par Chemin de Fer”. The CLM Convention applies mostly to intermodal transport in Europe. The contract of carriage under the CIM is the “CIM consignment note”, similar to a bill of lading for ocean carriage.

 

Cargo retention clause. When liquid cargoes are discharged from tankers differences can occur between the quantities stated in bills of lading to have been loaded and the quantities measured on discharge.

Chartering brokers. Chartering brokers act as intermediaries between shipowners seeking employment for their vessels and charterers-requiring the services of a ship.

Containers and bills of lading. With the advent of containerisation and also intermodalism, much cargo is being carried in containers, especially smaller consignments which can be carried on a "door-to-door" service.

Cargo-Quality. A description in the bill of lading as to the quality of goods does not bind the carrier. The person signing and issuing the bill of lading is not considered to have the expertise nor the duty to ascertain quality. The shipowner can adduce evidence to show that the goods were not of the quality stated on the bill of lading.

 

Cargo measurement. The EXXONVOY 84 tanker voyage charter form contains a comprehensive "Cargo measurement clause". Before loading, the master is required to measure the on-board quantities of oil, water and sediment residues, which are segregated in all holding tanks and slop tanks.

COFC (Container on Flat Car). This form of transport is related to inter-modal transport in which a container with cargo in it would have been transported by sea or by road to a railhead and then loaded on to a flat rail-car for the remainder of the journey by rail. The deregulation of the railways in the United States in 1980 was extended to the intermodal COFC transport in March 1981 and this is one method of transporting goods which may have been the forerunner to other intermodal transport methods operated for containers, such as the DST or “Double stack trains” or the “piggy-back trains” operated by some railway companies and even traditional ocean carriers in the U.S.

 

Cofferdam. In oil tankers the oil tanks are separated from the engine room by means of a cofferdam formed by two transverse bulkheads. The cofferdam extends over the entire breadth of the vessel and prevents leakage from the oil tanks to the engine room or diesel-oil bunkers. The pump rooms are also separated from adjacent tanks by cofferdams.

 

Container sizes. The sizes of containers depend mainly on their external dimensions, so that, for example, a container can be an ISO standard “Series 1 Freight container, Rating 1AA” with external dimensions of 40 feet (length) x 8 feet (width) x 8 feet 6 inches (height). The dimensions are used in either imperial or metric units. Although much of the world has become metricated, the “box” or container is still referred to by its imperial units, for example, a FEU is a forty-foot equivalent unit (of space occupied).

Colliery guarantee. This is an undertaking in a contract between the colliery owners and the charterer or shipowner. The colliery agrees to supply the cargo and load the vessel on usual colliery terms. If a reference to "colliery guarantee" is incorporated in a coal charterparty the charterer is relieved from any liability for delay to the vessel if the colliery does not supply the coal within the agreed laytime.

 

Charterer. The person or corporation hiring a ship for the carriage of goods or passengers (either a "time Charterer" or a "voyage Charterer") or leasing the ship for his own management and control (a "bareboat/demise Charterer").

 

Calls or Premiums. Some mutual associations term the payments for cover as “calls” while others term them as “premiums”. The concept of mutuality is that each member protects the others and this is done by levying “calls” rather than the businessman’s “premium”.

Collision and dock damage. Excess collision liability. Proportion of collision liability relating to wreck removal, dock damage or oil pollution caused by the other ship.