Cover note. A contract of marine insurance concluded when the proposal of the assured is accepted by the insurer, whether the policy is then issued or not. For the purpose of showing when the proposal was accepted, reference may be made to the slip or cover note or other customary memorandum of the contract, although it may be unstamped.

Class surveyors’ assistance to vessel. If a vessel has sustained damage to such an extent that her seaworthiness may be affected, the master will contact the surveyor of the classification society, in order to ascertain what repairs have to be carried out for the maintenance of class.

Colliery. A "colliery" is a coal mine and in voyage charters for the carriage of coal the laytime agreed may depend on the working hours of the mine, if the coal cargo has to be delivered to the vessel. The word is connected to expressions that affect laytime.

 

Colliery turn. This refers to the order in which vessels are taken into the loading and/or discharging berth. This may change the requirements for the commencement of laytime.

Consortium. A group of shipowners may agree to offer their ships to an organisation formed by the members of the group for the organisation (the "consortium") to operate. "Shipping pools" are one form of consortia, generally operating in the tramp shipping, bulk trades. In liner trades, liner conferences fulfil much the same function except that each member company operates its ship independent of a centralised control organisation. In chartering practice, the administration organisation of a consortium or shipping pool can charter ships in or -out as necessary to carry out its cargo commitments or earn acceptable revenue.

 

Cartel. This is a price-fixing body formed of providers or suppliers of goods or services. A liner conference can be considered to be a cartel to fix the freight rates.

 

Complement. The entire crew of a vessel is called the “complement”. The complement can be subdivided into, for example, the officer complement, and the rating complement.

 

Cargo and bills of lading. The bill of lading is essentially a receipt for cargo. Therefore the statements in the document connecting the bill of lading and cargo are of great importance to the buyer of the goods, the consignee or endorsee, the banks in a documentary credits system and the possibility of liability of the earner. Statements can refer to the nature, condition, quality and quantity of the cargo.

 

Charterer. The person or corporation hiring a ship for the carriage of goods or passengers (either a "time Charterer" or a "voyage Charterer") or leasing the ship for his own management and control (a "bareboat/demise Charterer").

 

Conbulker. This is a type of vessel that can carry containers on one leg of a voyage and bulk cargo on the return leg. The structure of the vessel permits the cargoes to be changed easily.

 

Cargo retention clause. When liquid cargoes are discharged from tankers differences can occur between the quantities stated in bills of lading to have been loaded and the quantities measured on discharge.

Charterparty bills of lading. In "Charterers' bills of lading" (above)' emphasis was laid on the identity of the carrier and whether this person was the charterer. The charterparty and the bill of lading are also connected usually by incorporation of charterparty terms and conditions into the bill of lading.

Charterparty. This is the document that contains the details of the charter or contract. While the shipowner and charterer are called the "parties to the charter", the word "party" in "charterparty" originates from the old Latin phrase for the contract to use a ship.

Centre of gravity (G). The line of action of the weight (force) of a body acts vertically downwards through this point, named “G”. For a uniform block, G is at the centre. For a ship, the position of G depends on the various weights in the ship.