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Complement. The entire crew of a vessel is called the “complement”. The complement can be subdivided into, for example, the officer complement, and the rating complement.

 

Consortium. A group of shipowners may agree to offer their ships to an organisation formed by the members of the group for the organisation (the "consortium") to operate. "Shipping pools" are one form of consortia, generally operating in the tramp shipping, bulk trades. In liner trades, liner conferences fulfil much the same function except that each member company operates its ship independent of a centralised control organisation. In chartering practice, the administration organisation of a consortium or shipping pool can charter ships in or -out as necessary to carry out its cargo commitments or earn acceptable revenue.

 

Class surveyors’ assistance to vessel. If a vessel has sustained damage to such an extent that her seaworthiness may be affected, the master will contact the surveyor of the classification society, in order to ascertain what repairs have to be carried out for the maintenance of class.

Cross trades. On trade routes between two places or countries the ships belonging to each country may have a large share of the trade but ships belonging to other countries may be allowed to carry cargo as “cross traders”.

Ceiling.The ceiling consists of wooden planks laid on top of the double bottom tanks. The planks are laid longitudinally and prevent contact between the cargo and the double bottom.

Cover note. A contract of marine insurance concluded when the proposal of the assured is accepted by the insurer, whether the policy is then issued or not. For the purpose of showing when the proposal was accepted, reference may be made to the slip or cover note or other customary memorandum of the contract, although it may be unstamped.

Colliery working days. This is a description of type of laytime depending on the ordinary working hours of the colliery from which the coal will be delivered to the vessel. The working days are related to normal times and in normal circumstances. Colliery holidays will be "holidays" if an exception to laytime exists in the charterparty (for example, "SHEX"). If the workers in a colliery are on strike, the delay is not excepted from the laytime, unless, of course, there is an appropriate "strike clause", unless a Sunday or holiday occurs during the strike.

 

Consol. This expression is an abbreviation found in sailing schedules and advertisements of liner services.

Carrier. The carrier of goods under a bill of lading to which the. Hague-Visby Rules apply includes the shipowner or the charterer who enters into a contract of carriage with a shipper.

Customary. This word usually refers to the rate at which cargo operations are to take place and may affect the time the vessel is made available by the owner for these operations.

Cargo and bills of lading. The bill of lading is essentially a receipt for cargo. Therefore the statements in the document connecting the bill of lading and cargo are of great importance to the buyer of the goods, the consignee or endorsee, the banks in a documentary credits system and the possibility of liability of the earner. Statements can refer to the nature, condition, quality and quantity of the cargo.

 

Calendar month. A vessel may be fixed on a time charter basis, either for the period occupied by a certain voyage; e.g., "for one voyage from the UK and/or Continent to Australia via port or ports in charterers' option" or for the term of ". . . calendar months, commencing from time of delivery at . . ." the port agreed upon.

Concentrates. This is a material in small particle form which results from a processing of natural ore. The main hazard associated with concentrates is that moisture entrained in the particles may settle out and the surface reach a nearly fluid state which will affect the ship’s stability if the cargo shifts. Moreover, some concentrates, such as iron concentrates produced when iron is crushed dry, contain sulphur so that if concentrates become damp the sulphur reacts with the oxygen in the surrounding air to produce heat. Compartments containing concentrates should not be ventilated in order to reduce the oxygen content.

 

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