Deductibles. Whilst there is no provision in the standard cargo clauses to apply any form of deductible, there is always a deductible expressed in a hull policy on full conditions.

Dreadage or Dreading clause. Grain is usually carried in. bulk or in bags. In a charterparty for grain cargo, a clause can give the charterer the option to ship general cargo with certain restrictions, such as a minimum quantity, and exclusion of cargoes that may cause damage to any grain loaded.

Days. When a charterparty provides for laytime to be fixed or calculable this can be referred to a number of "days".

Despatch days. Days saved in the loading or discharge of the vessel within the time allowed under the charterparty may be called "despatch days".

 

Days on demurrage. These are days by which the agreed number of laydays for loading or discharge is exceeded. In some charters a limited fixed number of days on demurrage is agreed, in addition to the laytime allowed. Shipowners are entitled to damages for detention if, after demurrage days have expired, further delay is experienced.

 

Down to her marks. This expression means that the vessel has been loaded to her maximum permissible draught, either winter, summer or tropical loadlines, as the case may be.

Dirty. This expression is regulary used in tanker freight market reports and refers to fixtures for “dirty” oils, e.g., fuel oil, lubricating oil and crude oil, in contrast with “clean oils”, e.g., gasoline, diesel oil, etc. A “dirty service” is the tanker transportation of crude oil and residual fuels. A “dirty ship” is a tanker which has been carrying crude and heavy persistent oils such as fuel oil. “Dirty ballast” is ballast that is carried in unwashed cargo oil tanks.

 

Dock charter. A "dock" is an area within a port within which cargo can be loaded of discharged. It can be enclosed by "dock walls" or "breakwaters". In relation to chartering, a dock can be a named destination for the ship to be an "arrived ship" and laytime commencing under a voyage charter or hire commencing under a time charter. A dock, as a destination in a dock charter, is less specific than a berth (a place within a dock or port) under a berth charter and more specific than a port in a port charter.

Date line. When steaming from West to East time is lost for each time zone. Conversely, when proceeding from East to West time is gained.

Disbursements. This expression covers all payments made by the ship’s agents for port charges, stevedoring expenses, tug hire, customs fees, stores, bunkers, water, etc., on behalf of owners. The agents may charge a certain disbursements’ commission on such advances, e.g., 2½ per cent.

 

Days. When a charterparty provides for laytime to be fixed or calculable this can be referred to a number of "days". The number of days is sometimes called "laydays" but this term is better used for the "Laydays and Cancelling" clause.

Depth. The depth is the vertical distance measured from the keel to the deck. The extreme depth is the depth measured at the ship’s side from the uppermost continuous deck to the lower point of the keel. The moulded depth is measured from the top of the keel plate (the “base line”) to the underside (that is, the heel) of the deck beam at the ship’s side amidships.

 

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