FIATA Bill of Lading. FIATA is the acronym for the International Federation of Forwarding Agents Associations and is based in Zurich, Switzerland.

Full and down. A vessel is said to be “full and down” when loaded in such a way that upon sailing she is down to her loadline marks-each winter, summer or tropical loadline whilst the cargo space has been fully utilised. Unless rates of freight for heavy and light cargo vary considerably, best results, from a revenue standpoint, are obtained by loading a ship full and down. To achieve this result, a proper ratio between light and heavy cargo must be determined, which depends on the type and quantity of cargo available.

 

Fumigation. When the vessel has rats or other vermin on board, and also infestation from cargo, these undesirable elements must be eliminated. This is done by fumigation. Some fumigation agents may be toxic for humans.

FONASBA. The Federation of National Associations of Shipbrokers and Agents. This organisation was established in 1969 and comprises national (usually European) associations of shipbrokers and agents who deal with a wide variety of agency work, such as liner agency, port agency and shipbroking for the chartering of and sale and purchase of ships. In 1989, 22 national associations belonged to FONASBA.

First Class Charterer. When the charterer does not want his identity known too early, he may instruct his shipbroker ("Charterer's agent") to keep his identity hidden, perhaps until serious shipowners have come up with FIRM OFFERS. The shipbroker will indicate that the charterer is directly known to him and he vouches for the charterer. The shipowner should, however, press for some information as to the identity of the charterer so that he can, perhaps, request BIMCO to check in its "Reference Register" if the nominated "Charterer" is recorded as generally being in default of payments.

 

Fighting ship. When liner conferences are faced with severe competition from outsiders, the members of the conference may agree to use additional vessels or sailings at very low freight rates.

Freight idea. When this phrase is used in a communication from one shipbroker to another during negotiations for a charter, it is used by an owner's broker to indicate the desirable level of freight or the intended level of freight a charterer would be prepared to pay (when the phrase is used by a charterer's broker). It is a preliminary to more serious negotiations before the ship is fixed. The freight idea, from either side, can form the foundation of Voyage Estimating. The parties can then use the information to compare what other owners or charterers are considering so as to take up the best employment for the ship.

 

Free from incumbrances. Sale contracts of ships usually contain the proviso “free from incumbrances” which implies that the vessel is free from any mortgage or other debt.

 

Flag of Registry. The flag which is displayed usually on the stern of the vessel is like an indicator or "badge" of the vessel's national identity or nationality.

False date on the bill of lading. The contract of sale between the buyer and seller may impose a condition whereby the goods must be shipped and “onboard, shipped bills of lading” obtained by a certain date.

Certificate of free pratique. This is a certificate from the port-health-authorities that the ship is without infectious disease or plague on board and therefore permitted to enter port and to allow people to board and disembark.

Freight units. When charging freight for the carriage of goods and the rate of freight is to be based on weight, a distinction can be made between:

Fines. Imposed on the owner for breach by his servants of regulations such as immigration, customs, smuggling by crew members, pollution. Fines for overloading are specifically excluded.

 

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