Salvage principles.  “General Average”.  The essential elements of general average were discussed based on the definition in the York-Antwerp Rules 1990 and in the Marine Insurance Act 1906.

Standard form bills of lading. Many carriers use pre-printed standard forms. These can be their own forms or standard forms issued under standard-form charterparties or published by certain organisations.

Stowage factor warranty. When a ship is chartered to load a "full and complete cargo" or a "Min/Max" quantity, the owner is interested in the actual quantity being loaded by the Charterer, especially if his freight revenue is based on the quantity.

Ship's papers

The documents, such as the ship's license, logbook, or bills of lading, that a ship must carry under international law and that must be shown on inspection.

Suez Canal tonnage. The main purpose of the special measurement system is to establish criteria which determine the owner’s liability to pay Suez Canal tolls.

SWAD (Salt water arrival draught). This is a description of a vessel's draught in salt water when arrives at a port where the water density is that of salt water, that is 1025 kilograms per cubic metre.

Shifting boards. In older ships loading grain in bulk, all necessary and reasonable precautions were taken to prevent the grain from shifting by fitting shifting boards.

Surf days. Laytime can be interrupted by bad weather and by meteorological conditions, which may interfere with loading and/or discharging.

Subject details. This is one area of the law where American practice is very different from English practice and an area where considerable difficulty and complexity arise. Therefore some analysis will be offered.

Subject managers' approval. For the shipowner this can be a somewhat troublesome qualification because it indicates that the charterer's negotiator has to refer all the issues to a third party to make a final decision.

Said to weigh. Under the Hague Rules or Hague-Visby Rules, the carriers issue bills of lading showing either the quantity or weight, as the case may be, as furnished in writing by the shipper on the understanding that the carrier is not bound to state or show in the bills of lading arty quantity or weight which he has reasonable ground to suspect is not accurate or which he cannot reasonably check.

Shippers’ councils.  When liner conferences were formed they represented the ocean carriers and whether or not they exercised monopoly power, they still presented a negotiating group that had strong bargaining power.

Subjects. When a contract is being negotiated, one side makes offers and the unconditional acceptance of these offers by the other side creates an "agreement".