Subject to insurance. This is one restriction in a charterparty that is not really relevant to the making of the formal contract in the same way that the other "subjects" are.

Subject financing. This qualification can be used by a charterer to indicate that he is attempting to finance a transaction for which he needs a ship, for example, he wishes to purchase a quantity of bulk cargo such as sugar, and needs a ship to transport it. It can also be used by a purchaser of a ship before confirming that he can complete the purchase.

 

Spot market. When a shipowner or vessel operator wishes to use the vessel for tramping services, on voyage charters only, he is said to offer his ship on the spot market.

Cargo plan or stowage plan. In the regular liner trade it is customary to draw up a stowage plan, showing in different colours the part of the ship in which the various parcels have been stowed, stating at the same time marks and destination.

Sue and labour. When a casualty occurs, the assured, in particular the master, is bound to take such measures as may be reasonable for the purpose of averting or minimising loss or damage of ship and cargo.

Spot. This is a common term used for a vessel, which can commence loading immediately after the charter has been fixed. Consequently the vessel must have arrived at her loading port. This expression is also used in connection with cargo, which is available for immediate loading.

 

Surf days. Laytime can be interrupted by bad weather and by meteorological conditions, which may interfere with loading and/or discharging.

Subject to drydocking. This would possibly be used by a charterer in the negotiations for a time charter in order to establish that a ship would be allowed to be dry docked by the owner but would be off hire during the ducking period.

 

Shippers’ councils.  When liner conferences were formed they represented the ocean carriers and whether or not they exercised monopoly power, they still presented a negotiating group that had strong bargaining power.

Statement of facts (SOF). This is the document attached to a record of calculation of laytime used (the "Timesheet") and is a record of the events that can affect the counting of laytime.

Stowage factor warranty. When a ship is chartered to load a "full and complete cargo" or a "Min/Max" quantity, the owner is interested in the actual quantity being loaded by the Charterer, especially if his freight revenue is based on the quantity.