Safe berth. This is a description of the specific place the Charterer can send the ship for loading and/or discharging.

SSW. This is an abbreviation for "Summer Salt Water" and refers to the draught of the ship when it is loaded to its summer load line in salt water, that is, in the open sea. The summer draught is the maximum draught to which the ship can be loaded depending on the "freeboards" and "loadlines" assigned to it by the assigning authorities.

 

Supercargo. When taking a vessel on charter, it can be a practice for charterers to reserve the right to keep on board at any time and for any length of time a "supercargo", at their own expense, for the duration of the time charter.

Spot market. When a shipowner or vessel operator wishes to use the vessel for tramping services, on voyage charters only, he is said to offer his ship on the spot market.

Sub-letting. It is customary to stipulate in a time or voyage charterparty that charterers have the right of sub-letting the whole or part of the vessel on the understanding, however, that they remain responsible to the shipowners for the due fulfilment of the original charterparty. In the case of a voyage charterparty, sub-letting will probably take the form of booking other cargo by charterers.

 

Subject to . . . Many other examples can be cited of the use of "subjects" and both owners and charterers and their middlemen, the shipbrokers, do have considerable imagination to invent and introduce new situations which are meant to influence the enforceability of a time charter or a voyage charter.

Cargo plan or stowage plan. In the regular liner trade it is customary to draw up a stowage plan, showing in different colours the part of the ship in which the various parcels have been stowed, stating at the same time marks and destination.

Sets of bills of lading. Bills of lading are requested by shippers in a set usually of three “originals”, although in some Countries many more “original” sets may be required for different reasons, some commercial, some regulatory.

Sue and labour. When a casualty occurs, the assured, in particular the master, is bound to take such measures as may be reasonable for the purpose of averting or minimising loss or damage of ship and cargo.

Signed under protest. If charterers or shippers object to the insertion of a certain clause in the bills of lading, the master may sign the bills of lading under protest.