Sue and labour. When a casualty occurs, the assured, in particular the master, is bound to take such measures as may be reasonable for the purpose of averting or minimising loss or damage of ship and cargo.

Subject to insurance. This is one restriction in a charterparty that is not really relevant to the making of the formal contract in the same way that the other "subjects" are.

Short form of bill of lading. These bills of lading are issued by shipping companies or agents, that is, carriers, and indicate that some or all the terms and conditions of the document which is evidence of the contract of carnage can be found in another document, the “long form of bill of lading”. This latter may be obtainable on request or can be inspected at the office of the carrier or agent.

 

Subject to strike and lockout clause. In a similar manner to "subject to dry-docking clause", this qualification indicates that the parties are in agreement to all the terms provided one party accepts the wording of a clause setting out the rights and responsibilities of the parties should the event mentioned take place.

Subject to . . . Many other examples can be cited of the use of "subjects" and both owners and charterers and their middlemen, the shipbrokers, do have considerable imagination to invent and introduce new situations which are meant to influence the enforceability of a time charter or a voyage charter.

Shipper. In the U.S. Shipping Act 1984 the “shipper” was defined as: “an owner or person for whose account the ocean transportation is provided or the person to whom delivery is to be made.”

Shipbroker. The shipbroker acts as an intermediary between charterers, shippers and consignees of cargo on one side and the shipowners or carriers by sea on the other. The principal functions of a shipbroker are:

Stability. The stability of a ship is the tendency she possesses to return to her original position after she has heeled because of external forces. The stability of a ship mainly depends upon the metacentric height.

 

Subject to licence being granted. This term is used in negotiations as regards the chartering of a vessel at a time when owners are not free to commit their vessel for a certain employment without having obtained the approval of competent authorities. Consequently, a charterparty issued under such condition is not effective until such licence has been definitely granted.

 

Subject approval of relevant authority. This affects the enforceability of a charter if the ship's certification and cargo handling capabilities are required to meet with official approval. For example, if a vessel is not provided with a valid "document of authorisation" it may not be allowed to load grain and the charter may depend on permission being granted to load.

 

Subject to signing charterparty. This expression is similar to "subject to contract". The formal document has not been signed (or "executed") and the entire contract and its terms are held in abeyance until the signing.