Subject to insurance. This is one restriction in a charterparty that is not really relevant to the making of the formal contract in the same way that the other "subjects" are.

Subject to contract. In this situation, a formal contract has yet to be signed. However, the main provisions have probably been agreed during negotiations.

Subject managers' approval. For the shipowner this can be a somewhat troublesome qualification because it indicates that the charterer's negotiator has to refer all the issues to a third party to make a final decision.

Seasonal ports. Ports which are only accessible to ocean shipping during part of the year, such as ports in the St. Lawrence and in the White Sea, are called seasonal ports. Because of ice, these ports and their approaches are closed for navigation between December and spring.

 

Shipper. In the U.S. Shipping Act 1984 the “shipper” was defined as: “an owner or person for whose account the ocean transportation is provided or the person to whom delivery is to be made.”

Subject financing. This qualification can be used by a charterer to indicate that he is attempting to finance a transaction for which he needs a ship, for example, he wishes to purchase a quantity of bulk cargo such as sugar, and needs a ship to transport it. It can also be used by a purchaser of a ship before confirming that he can complete the purchase.

 

Sheer. The sheer of a vessel is the longitudinal curvature of the deck from the lowest point on deck amidships. The average sheer of a general cargo vessel is about 1 per cent of the ship’s length. The sheer may increase the vessel’s reserve buoyancy. Sheer features in the assignment of load lines.

 

Subject to . . . Many other examples can be cited of the use of "subjects" and both owners and charterers and their middlemen, the shipbrokers, do have considerable imagination to invent and introduce new situations which are meant to influence the enforceability of a time charter or a voyage charter.

Subject to drydocking. This would possibly be used by a charterer in the negotiations for a time charter in order to establish that a ship would be allowed to be dry docked by the owner but would be off hire during the ducking period.

 

Stability. The stability of a ship is the tendency she possesses to return to her original position after she has heeled because of external forces. The stability of a ship mainly depends upon the metacentric height.

 

Subject to strike and lockout clause. In a similar manner to "subject to dry-docking clause", this qualification indicates that the parties are in agreement to all the terms provided one party accepts the wording of a clause setting out the rights and responsibilities of the parties should the event mentioned take place.

Subject to licence being granted. This term is used in negotiations as regards the chartering of a vessel at a time when owners are not free to commit their vessel for a certain employment without having obtained the approval of competent authorities. Consequently, a charterparty issued under such condition is not effective until such licence has been definitely granted.

 

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