Subject to . . . Many other examples can be cited of the use of "subjects" and both owners and charterers and their middlemen, the shipbrokers, do have considerable imagination to invent and introduce new situations which are meant to influence the enforceability of a time charter or a voyage charter.

Subject approval of relevant authority. This affects the enforceability of a charter if the ship's certification and cargo handling capabilities are required to meet with official approval. For example, if a vessel is not provided with a valid "document of authorisation" it may not be allowed to load grain and the charter may depend on permission being granted to load.

 

Subject to drydocking. This would possibly be used by a charterer in the negotiations for a time charter in order to establish that a ship would be allowed to be dry docked by the owner but would be off hire during the ducking period.

 

Subject to insurance. This is one restriction in a charterparty that is not really relevant to the making of the formal contract in the same way that the other "subjects" are.

Subject to strike and lockout clause. In a similar manner to "subject to dry-docking clause", this qualification indicates that the parties are in agreement to all the terms provided one party accepts the wording of a clause setting out the rights and responsibilities of the parties should the event mentioned take place.

Subject to Government permission. This is another example, similar to "subject to shippers' approval", for a party other than the two negotiating parties, the owner and the charterer, influencing whether the parties can enter into the charter.

Seasonal ports. Ports which are only accessible to ocean shipping during part of the year, such as ports in the St. Lawrence and in the White Sea, are called seasonal ports. Because of ice, these ports and their approaches are closed for navigation between December and spring.

 

Sets of bills of lading. Bills of lading are requested by shippers in a set usually of three “originals”, although in some Countries many more “original” sets may be required for different reasons, some commercial, some regulatory.

SSW. This is an abbreviation for "Summer Salt Water" and refers to the draught of the ship when it is loaded to its summer load line in salt water, that is, in the open sea. The summer draught is the maximum draught to which the ship can be loaded depending on the "freeboards" and "loadlines" assigned to it by the assigning authorities.

 

Salvage costs. This expression includes all expenses properly incurred by the salvor in the performance of the salvage services.

 

Shipbroker. The shipbroker acts as an intermediary between charterers, shippers and consignees of cargo on one side and the shipowners or carriers by sea on the other. The principal functions of a shipbroker are:

Subject shippers' approval. Like the previous restriction, this is also a "condition precedent" which can cause the fixture to fail to be binding if the shippers do not accept the ship to load the cargo. Again, also like the previous restriction, this can require a third party's approval before a charter between the owner and the charterer becomes binding.

 

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