Statement of facts (SOF). This is the document attached to a record of calculation of laytime used (the "Timesheet") and is a record of the events that can affect the counting of laytime.

Subject approval of relevant authority. This affects the enforceability of a charter if the ship's certification and cargo handling capabilities are required to meet with official approval. For example, if a vessel is not provided with a valid "document of authorisation" it may not be allowed to load grain and the charter may depend on permission being granted to load.

 

Subject to Government permission. This is another example, similar to "subject to shippers' approval", for a party other than the two negotiating parties, the owner and the charterer, influencing whether the parties can enter into the charter.

Subject to contract. In this situation, a formal contract has yet to be signed. However, the main provisions have probably been agreed during negotiations.

Shipowners. The owners of a vessel are the persons or companies officially registered as owners of the ship.

Subject to insurance. This is one restriction in a charterparty that is not really relevant to the making of the formal contract in the same way that the other "subjects" are.

Shipbroker. The shipbroker acts as an intermediary between charterers, shippers and consignees of cargo on one side and the shipowners or carriers by sea on the other. The principal functions of a shipbroker are:

Spot. This is a common term used for a vessel, which can commence loading immediately after the charter has been fixed. Consequently the vessel must have arrived at her loading port. This expression is also used in connection with cargo, which is available for immediate loading.

 

Subject to signing charterparty. This expression is similar to "subject to contract". The formal document has not been signed (or "executed") and the entire contract and its terms are held in abeyance until the signing.

 

Subject financing. This qualification can be used by a charterer to indicate that he is attempting to finance a transaction for which he needs a ship, for example, he wishes to purchase a quantity of bulk cargo such as sugar, and needs a ship to transport it. It can also be used by a purchaser of a ship before confirming that he can complete the purchase.

 

Strikes and Lockouts. When the loading and/or discharging are interrupted by hindrances beyond the control of either the charterer or the shipowner, the effect on laytime and on demurrage can become quite significant because of the cost of the loss of time.

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