Subject approval of relevant authority. This affects the enforceability of a charter if the ship's certification and cargo handling capabilities are required to meet with official approval. For example, if a vessel is not provided with a valid "document of authorisation" it may not be allowed to load grain and the charter may depend on permission being granted to load.

 

Stability. The stability of a ship is the tendency she possesses to return to her original position after she has heeled because of external forces. The stability of a ship mainly depends upon the metacentric height.

 

Short form of bill of lading. These bills of lading are issued by shipping companies or agents, that is, carriers, and indicate that some or all the terms and conditions of the document which is evidence of the contract of carnage can be found in another document, the “long form of bill of lading”. This latter may be obtainable on request or can be inspected at the office of the carrier or agent.

 

Subject to contract. In this situation, a formal contract has yet to be signed. However, the main provisions have probably been agreed during negotiations.

Subject to Government permission. This is another example, similar to "subject to shippers' approval", for a party other than the two negotiating parties, the owner and the charterer, influencing whether the parties can enter into the charter.

Switched bills of lading. A country may not have diplomatic relations with another country but traders in one or the other may wish to have goods transported between these countries.

Subjects. When a contract is being negotiated, one side makes offers and the unconditional acceptance of these offers by the other side creates an "agreement".

Sub-letting. It is customary to stipulate in a time or voyage charterparty that charterers have the right of sub-letting the whole or part of the vessel on the understanding, however, that they remain responsible to the shipowners for the due fulfilment of the original charterparty. In the case of a voyage charterparty, sub-letting will probably take the form of booking other cargo by charterers.

 

Shippers’ associations.  This is a group of shippers that consolidates or distributes freight on a non-profit basis for the members of the group in order to secure volume rates or service contracts (U.S. Shipping Act 1984).

Shipper. In the U.S. Shipping Act 1984 the “shipper” was defined as: “an owner or person for whose account the ocean transportation is provided or the person to whom delivery is to be made.”

Suspension of laytime. The counting of laytime against a charterer can be interrupted by bad weather and for other reasons. These are "interruptions", suspensions or exceptions to laytime. If laytime is not expressly suspended by appropriate words in the charterparty, it runs continuously.

 

Subject to licence being granted. This term is used in negotiations as regards the chartering of a vessel at a time when owners are not free to commit their vessel for a certain employment without having obtained the approval of competent authorities. Consequently, a charterparty issued under such condition is not effective until such licence has been definitely granted.

 

Seasonal ports. Ports which are only accessible to ocean shipping during part of the year, such as ports in the St. Lawrence and in the White Sea, are called seasonal ports. Because of ice, these ports and their approaches are closed for navigation between December and spring.

 

Sheer. The sheer of a vessel is the longitudinal curvature of the deck from the lowest point on deck amidships. The average sheer of a general cargo vessel is about 1 per cent of the ship’s length. The sheer may increase the vessel’s reserve buoyancy. Sheer features in the assignment of load lines.