Strikes and Lockouts. When the loading and/or discharging are interrupted by hindrances beyond the control of either the charterer or the shipowner, the effect on laytime and on demurrage can become quite significant because of the cost of the loss of time.

Spot. This is a common term used for a vessel, which can commence loading immediately after the charter has been fixed. Consequently the vessel must have arrived at her loading port. This expression is also used in connection with cargo, which is available for immediate loading.

 

Subject to drydocking. This would possibly be used by a charterer in the negotiations for a time charter in order to establish that a ship would be allowed to be dry docked by the owner but would be off hire during the ducking period.

 

Stability. The stability of a ship is the tendency she possesses to return to her original position after she has heeled because of external forces. The stability of a ship mainly depends upon the metacentric height.

 

Subject to licence being granted. This term is used in negotiations as regards the chartering of a vessel at a time when owners are not free to commit their vessel for a certain employment without having obtained the approval of competent authorities. Consequently, a charterparty issued under such condition is not effective until such licence has been definitely granted.

 

Subject shippers' approval. Like the previous restriction, this is also a "condition precedent" which can cause the fixture to fail to be binding if the shippers do not accept the ship to load the cargo. Again, also like the previous restriction, this can require a third party's approval before a charter between the owner and the charterer becomes binding.

 

Subject to . . . Many other examples can be cited of the use of "subjects" and both owners and charterers and their middlemen, the shipbrokers, do have considerable imagination to invent and introduce new situations which are meant to influence the enforceability of a time charter or a voyage charter.

Suspension of laytime. The counting of laytime against a charterer can be interrupted by bad weather and for other reasons. These are "interruptions", suspensions or exceptions to laytime. If laytime is not expressly suspended by appropriate words in the charterparty, it runs continuously.

 

Subject to Government permission. This is another example, similar to "subject to shippers' approval", for a party other than the two negotiating parties, the owner and the charterer, influencing whether the parties can enter into the charter.

Sheer. The sheer of a vessel is the longitudinal curvature of the deck from the lowest point on deck amidships. The average sheer of a general cargo vessel is about 1 per cent of the ship’s length. The sheer may increase the vessel’s reserve buoyancy. Sheer features in the assignment of load lines.

 

Shipbroker. The shipbroker acts as an intermediary between charterers, shippers and consignees of cargo on one side and the shipowners or carriers by sea on the other. The principal functions of a shipbroker are:

Subject to strike and lockout clause. In a similar manner to "subject to dry-docking clause", this qualification indicates that the parties are in agreement to all the terms provided one party accepts the wording of a clause setting out the rights and responsibilities of the parties should the event mentioned take place.

Subject financing. This qualification can be used by a charterer to indicate that he is attempting to finance a transaction for which he needs a ship, for example, he wishes to purchase a quantity of bulk cargo such as sugar, and needs a ship to transport it. It can also be used by a purchaser of a ship before confirming that he can complete the purchase.

 

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