Bills of Lading Act 1855. Different countries have enacted legislation to protect holders of bills of lading generally from carriers, who were mainly shipowners in the 19th century and who would attempt to avoid any liability for loss of or damage to goods belonging to the holders of the bills of lading.

Bearer bill of lading. This document allows the goods to be delivered to the holder of it. The name of the consignee, to whom the goods have been sent, perhaps the buyer, may be stated as "bearer".

Broken stowage. This refers to space not occupied by cargo iii a cargo compartment or even in a container. It can be caused by fittings in the ship, such as car decks in a ro ro vessel or web frames in a cargo hold. It can also be caused by the nonuniform shape of the cargo pieces themselves, such as the spaces around protrusions in heavy machinery or between curved casks.

Baltimore Berth Grain Charterparty (Form C) (BALTIMORE FORM C) (BFC). A general purpose voyage charterparty originally published in 1913 and adapted in 1971. There is a general feeling in shipbroking circles that the BFC is not very good but it is still in common use for full cargoes of grain from the U.S. and Canada to all parts of the world.

 

Bonded stores. Ship’s stores which can be delivered under special arrangements direct from a bonded warehouse to the vessel without payment of Customs duties.

 

Berth terms. This expression is used for shipments under a charterparty. The purpose of these "terms" is mainly to clarify which side pays for the loading and discharging costs of the cargo.

Breach of warranty of authority. An agent can make contracts between his principal and a third party. When he does this he "warrants" (or "promises" to the third party) that he has authority to carry out the act. When an agent, for example, a shipbroker, acts without any authority from his principal or exceeds the authority given to him, there is no contract and the principal is not bound. The agent can then become liable to one, or both, of the parties to the presumed contract for the breach of the warranty of authority.

Bunkers on delivery and redelivery. This "bunker clause" in a time charterparty stipulates that charterers shall accept and pay or all coal or fuel oil in the vessel's bunkers at port of delivery and, conversely, owners shall take over and pay for all coal or fuel ail in the vessel's bunkers at the port of redelivery at the current price at the respective ports. It is customary to agree upon a certain minimum and maximum quantity of bunkers on redelivery of the vessel (NYPE time charterparty).

Boot topping. The boot topping is part of the outside shell of the vessel between the light and loaded draught, that is, that part of the hull which is exposed alternately to wind and water. Moreover, the vessel’s berthing and unberthing and also tugs’ rubbing against the ship in the arrival and departure from ports lead to severe abrasion in this region.

Bunker clauses. "Bunkers" is the fuel energy used by a ship. This can include different grades and types of fuel oil used for different purposes. It can also include coal. In charterparties there are a number of clauses dealing with bunkers. BIMCO has issued, supported or recommended certain "Bunker clauses" that should be inserted in charterparties. These are listed below:

Balespace. The balespace of a vessel is the volume capacity of cargo spaces under deck (including hatchways), expressed in cubic feet or cubic metres.

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