Every ship becomes eligible for a periodic inspection as follows: (1) High Risk Ship (HRS): between 5 and 6 months after the last inspection in the PMoU region; (2) Standard Risk Ship (SRS): between 10 and 12 months after the last inspection in the PMoU region; (3) Low Risk Ship (LRS): between 24 and 36 months after the last inspection in the PMoU region. The time span for the next periodic inspection re-starts after any inspection.

A code number for the applicable control action. Examples are: 10: Deficiency rectified; 15: Rectify deficiency at next port; 16: Rectify deficiency within 14 days; 17: Master instructed to rectify deficiency before departure; 18: Rectify non-conformity within 3 months; 19: Rectify major non-conformity before departure; 30: Grounds for detention; 40: Next port of call informed; 50: Flag State/consul informed; 70: Classification society informed; 85: Investigation of contravention of discharge provisions in MARPOL.

 

The Ship Security Officer (SSO) should advise the Port Facility Security Officer (PFSO) without delay. The PFSO should undertake an assessment of the situation in consultation with the SSO and agree on appropriate security measures with the ship, which may include completion and signing of a Declaration of Security. Any costs entailed in additional security measures would be settled by the ship.

Where a port State authority requires that specific ballast water procedures and/or treatment option(s) be undertaken, and due to weather, sea conditions or operational impracticability such action cannot be taken, the master should report this fact to the port State authority as soon as possible and, where appropriate, prior to entering seas under its jurisdiction. (BWM Guidelines, 8.1.1)

No oil tanker of 5, 000 dwt or more carrying heavy grades of oil as cargo, irrespective of its flag, may enter or leave an EU port or offshore installation or anchor in an area under the jurisdiction of an EU Member State (including for ship-to-ship transfer operations, bunkering, crew changes, storing, etc. ), unless it is double-hulled. Single-hull oil tankers of 600 dwt or more but less than 5, 000 dwt can continue operating until the anniversary in 2008 of their delivery date. The ban is an interim measure pending the complete phasing-out of all single-hull tankers. (See also questions on Condition Assessment Scheme in Section D. )