Under section 9. 8 of the ISPS Code, ship security plans are not subject to inspection by officers duly authorized by a Contracting Government to carry out control and compliance measures in accordance with regulation XI-2/9, except in circumstances specified in section 9. 8.1. Section 9.8.1 provides that if the officers duly authorized by a Contracting Government have clear grounds to believe that the ship is not in compliance with the requirements of SOLAS chapter XI-2 or part A of the ISPS Code, and the only means to verify or rectify the non-compliance is to review the relevant requirements of the ship security plan, limited access to the specific sections of the plan relating to the non-compliance is exceptionally allowed, but only with the consent of the Contracting Government of, or the master of, the ship concerned. Nevertheless, the provisions in the plan relating to section 9. 4 subsections. 2,. 4,. 5,. 7,.15, . 17 and. 18 of Part A of the Code are considered as confidential information, and cannot be subject to inspection unless otherwise agreed by the Contracting Governments concerned. (ISPS Code, 9. 8. 1)

A signed undertaking given by cargo receivers stating that, in return for delivery to them or to their order of the goods noted in the bond, they agree to pay the proper proportion of any general average charges (and salvage or special charges) which may thereafter be ascertained to be due from the goods. Lloyd's Average Bond form (LAB 77) is normally used.

 

(1) Under Regulation 11: answer all questions as to health conditions on board put to him by a customs officer or authorised officer on arrival in port or if  already in port; (2) under Regulation 13: report, before arrival, any infectious disease, etc. on board; and, (3) under Regulation 15: if there was anything to report under Reg. 13, complete a Maritime Declaration of Health.

Lists of flag States ranked according to the number of detentions of ships flying their flags following port State control inspections in the Paris MoU region during the last three years. The Black List lists flag State with a significantly worse-than-average detention record, the White List lists flag States with a significantly better-than-average detention and the Grey List lists flag States with a detention record which is neither significantly better-than- average nor significantly worse-than-average. The lists are published on 1 July annually in the Paris MoU Annual Report.

 

Many States (including the UK) have enacted legislation incorporating the Hague-Visby Rules into their national sea carriage of goods law. Where no such national legislation applies, and there is no legislation making the Hague Rules or Hamburg Rules apply, the Hague-Visby Rules may still be made applicable by the shipowner inserting appropriate words into the Clause Paramount in the contract of carriage. 

A rule in major IMO conventions that, when inspecting a ship flying the flag of a State which is not a party to the Convention, Port State Control Officers must ensure that the treatment of such a ship and its crew is not more favourable than that of a ship flying the flag of a State party to that Convention. For example, many States have not yet ratified or acceded to MARPOL Annex VI, but ships flying their flags will still be required to meet the requirements of Annex VI to pass port State control inspections.

 

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