Under section 9. 8 of the ISPS Code, ship security plans are not subject to inspection by officers duly authorized by a Contracting Government to carry out control and compliance measures in accordance with regulation XI-2/9, except in circumstances specified in section 9. 8.1. Section 9.8.1 provides that if the officers duly authorized by a Contracting Government have clear grounds to believe that the ship is not in compliance with the requirements of SOLAS chapter XI-2 or part A of the ISPS Code, and the only means to verify or rectify the non-compliance is to review the relevant requirements of the ship security plan, limited access to the specific sections of the plan relating to the non-compliance is exceptionally allowed, but only with the consent of the Contracting Government of, or the master of, the ship concerned. Nevertheless, the provisions in the plan relating to section 9. 4 subsections. 2,. 4,. 5,. 7,.15, . 17 and. 18 of Part A of the Code are considered as confidential information, and cannot be subject to inspection unless otherwise agreed by the Contracting Governments concerned. (ISPS Code, 9. 8. 1)

A more detailed inspection must be carried out, including further checking of compliance with on-board operational requirements, if the Port State Control Officer has clear grounds for believing, after the initial inspection, that the condition of a ship or of its equipment or crew does not substantially meet the relevant requirements of a Convention. "Clear grounds" will exist when the PSCO finds evidence which in his professional judgment warrants a more detailed inspection of the ship, its equipment or its crew.

Lists of flag States ranked according to the number of detentions of ships flying their flags following port State control inspections in the Paris MoU region during the last three years. The Black List lists flag State with a significantly worse-than-average detention record, the White List lists flag States with a significantly better-than-average detention and the Grey List lists flag States with a detention record which is neither significantly better-than- average nor significantly worse-than-average. The lists are published on 1 July annually in the Paris MoU Annual Report.

 

The Secretary of State's Representative for Maritime Salvage and Intervention, who is appointed under UK legislation to take control at salvage incidents where there is a threat of significant pollution of UK waters. 

Compensation for a salvor who has carried out salvage operations in respect of a vessel which, by itself or its cargo, threatened damage to the environment but where the salvor has failed to earn a reward under Article 13 of the Salvage Convention at least equivalent to the special compensation assessable under Article 14. It was introduced into the 1989 Salvage Convention as an incentive to professional salvors to stay in the salvage business, since so many were leaving it due to low salvage rewards failing to cover high salvage costs.

Banning applies to all ship types and is based on the number of detentions of a ship in a specified period. (1) If a ship flies a flag on the Paris MoU Black List it will be banned after more than 2 detentions in the previous 36 months. (2) If a ship flies a flag on the Grey List it will be banned after more than 2 detentions in the previous 24 months.

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