Under section 9. 8 of the ISPS Code, ship security plans are not subject to inspection by officers duly authorized by a Contracting Government to carry out control and compliance measures in accordance with regulation XI-2/9, except in circumstances specified in section 9. 8.1. Section 9.8.1 provides that if the officers duly authorized by a Contracting Government have clear grounds to believe that the ship is not in compliance with the requirements of SOLAS chapter XI-2 or part A of the ISPS Code, and the only means to verify or rectify the non-compliance is to review the relevant requirements of the ship security plan, limited access to the specific sections of the plan relating to the non-compliance is exceptionally allowed, but only with the consent of the Contracting Government of, or the master of, the ship concerned. Nevertheless, the provisions in the plan relating to section 9. 4 subsections. 2,. 4,. 5,. 7,.15, . 17 and. 18 of Part A of the Code are considered as confidential information, and cannot be subject to inspection unless otherwise agreed by the Contracting Governments concerned. (ISPS Code, 9. 8. 1)

Every ship becomes eligible for a periodic inspection as follows: (1) High Risk Ship (HRS): between 5 and 6 months after the last inspection in the PMoU region; (2) Standard Risk Ship (SRS): between 10 and 12 months after the last inspection in the PMoU region; (3) Low Risk Ship (LRS): between 24 and 36 months after the last inspection in the PMoU region. The time span for the next periodic inspection re-starts after any inspection.

Except in the Panama Canal (see below), the pilot is an advisor to the master, without having command, navigational control or charge of the vessel. The pilot's duty is restricted to advising the master of local conditions affecting safe navigation. The master has full responsibility for the navigation and manoeuvring of his ship during all acts of pilotage. (Hence the bridge movement book term, "To Master's Orders and Pilot's Advice". )

 

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